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The Blood Typing Game 

The Blood Typing educational game and related reading material are based on the 1930 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, which was awarded for the discovery of human blood groups in 1901. The purpose of this educational game is to learn the basics about human blood types and blood typing, as well as understanding one reason for its importance - to be able to save lives performing safe blood transfusions. Another purpose is to offer a game experience that is challenging and fun! Try it now! https://www.nobelprize.org/educational/medicine/bloodtypinggame/

Fold It

The University of Washington created a game that ended up solving a key

problem to AIDS research. The university's Center for Game Science tackled the

issue of protein folding. In the human body, proteins perform vital functions,

like breaking down food to power muscles, and can also cause illnesses. The

more we know about the structure of a protein—how its chain of amino acids

are folded—the better equipped we are to combat diseases and create vaccines.

The game they created, FoldIt, allowed users to modify a protein structure and gave players a score based on how "good" of a fold they made. After professional scientists spent about 15 years trying and failing to figure out the structure of an AIDS-like virus found in monkeys, they put the problem out to the FoldIt community. Gamers solved the protein in 10 days! Try it now! https://fold.it/portal/

Popular Educational Games

Video games tend to be a form of communication that is a consumer friendly language spoken by children and adults alike. Digital educational games,

assessments, and interactive media function as a bridge technology that converts gaming from a social pastime to a powerful educational tool.

They challenge students  with game-based problem solving, conceptual reasoning, and goal-oriented decision making skills.They integrate embedded

learning, e.g., what the student knows and new information obtained in the gaming process, into problem solving skills and real time student

assessments. This phenomenon is unlike standardized classroom testing in which student achievement is a pass or fail process.

Well-designed educational games and interactive media integrate evidence- based learning theory, mimics successful pedagogic methods, and exploit

students’ interest in gaming. Well-designed educational gaming assessments are interactive, they do not punish the student, and provides feedback

on how to move to the next level of play. The end results should generate long-term changes in student performance, educational outcomes, and

career choices which may have not have been explored if not for the intervention provided by the educational game.

 

Supreme Decision

The first in a series of games being developed by Justice Sandra Day O’Connor teaching civic education through real court cases they get to choose, investigate, and argue. Supreme Decision lets players learn about people’s rights, which could lead to interest in a higher education for law. Try it now! https://www.icivics.org/games/supreme-decision
Popular Educational Games
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JCM Design
JCM Design

Popular Educational Games

Video games tend to be a form of communication that is a

consumer friendly language spoken by children and adults alike.

Digital educational games, assessments, and interactive media

function as a bridge technology that converts gaming from a

social pastime to a powerful educational tool. They challenge

students with game-based problem solving, conceptual

reasoning, and goal-oriented decision making skills. They

integrate embedded learning, e.g., what the student knows and

new information obtained in the gaming process, into problem

solving skills and real time student assessments. This

phenomenon is unlike standardized classroom testing in which

student achievement is a pass or fail process.

Well-designed educational games and interactive media

integrate evidence- based learning theory, mimics successful

pedagogic methods, and exploit students’ interest in gaming.

Well-designed educational gaming assessments are interactive,

they do not punish the student, and provides feedback on how

to move to the next level of play. The end results should

generate long-term changes in student performance,

educational outcomes, and career choices which may have not

have been explored if not for the intervention provided by the

educational game.

The Blood Typing Game

The Blood Typing educational game and related reading material are based on the 1930 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, which was awarded for the discovery of human blood groups in 1901. The purpose of this educational game is to learn the basics about human blood types and blood typing, as well as understanding one reason for its importance - to be able to save lives performing safe blood transfusions. Another purpose is to offer a game experience that is challenging and fun! Try it Now! https://www.nobelprize.org/educational/medicine/bloodtypingga me/

Fold It

The University of Washington created a game that ended up solving a key problem to AIDS research. The university's Center for Game Science tackled the issue of protein folding. In the human body, proteins perform vital functions, like breaking down food to power muscles, and can also cause illnesses. The more we know about the structure of a protein—how its chain of amino acids are folded—the better equipped we are to combat diseases and create vaccines. The game they created, FoldIt, allowed users to modify a protein structure and gave players a score based on how "good" of a fold they made. After professional scientists spent about 15 years trying and failing to figure out the structure of an AIDS-like virus found in monkeys, they put the problem out to the FoldIt community. Gamers solved the protein in 10 days! Try it Now! https://fold.it/portal/

Supreme Decision

The first in a series of games being developed by Justice Sandra Day O’Connor teaching civic education through real court cases they get to choose, investigate, and argue. Supreme Decision lets players learn about people’s rights, which could lead to interest in a higher education for law. Try it now! https://www.icivics.org/games/supreme-decision
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